Kai Johann Willms, M.A.

Contact

Graduiertenschule für Ost- und Südosteuropastudien
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Maria-Theresia-Straße 21
D-81675 München
Tel.: +49 (0)89 / 2180 - 9592
Email

Doctoral project

Agents of Cultural Transfer. Polish Émigré Scholars in the Development of Eastern European Studies in the United States, 1939–1989

The beginnings of the Cold War posed a challenge to political decision makers in the United States: Until World War II Eastern Europe had been a marginal field of research in American academia. In order to overcome this lack of expertise, new institutes and research centers for Eastern European Studies were established and generously funded. Since there were only few domestic experts, émigré scholars from Eastern and Central Europe constituted a vital human resource in this field. Many émigré scholars gratefully accepted these career opportunities, but they did not confine themselves to the role of knowledge suppliers for American politics; in many cases they pursued an agenda of their own. Already during World War II Polish émigré scholars founded research institutions and created transnational networks in order to promote their own historical narratives and mental maps within the public spheres of the Western world.

Drawing on the expanding research on the significance of migration for the production and circulation of knowledge and ideas, the project analyzes the role of Polish émigré scholars in the US as agents of a cultural transfer: What influence did they exert on the American image of Eastern Europe in the context of the Cold War? To what extent did they adopt, while assimilating into American society, ideas and knowledge from their new environment? How were the émigré scholars’ activities perceived in Poland before and after 1989? By pursuing these questions, the project contributes to a better understanding of the role of intellectual border crossers at the time of the Cold War and at the same time reflects on the epistemological question how the scholarly production of knowledge is shaped by the writer’s social context.

Curriculum Vitae

2010 to 2013 B.A. studies in History and Political Science in Freiburg, 2014 to 2016 M.A. studies in Modern European History in Berlin and Warsaw. 2016 Master’s thesis on the topic "'Détente' versus 'Solidarity'? Media Representations and Political Resonances of the Polish Crisis 1980–1983 in the Federal Republic of Germany", winning the Johann Gustav Droysen Prize of the Department of History at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. 2011 to 2016 scholarship holder of the German Academic Scholarship Foundation, 2012/2013 student assistant at the Chair of Modern and Eastern European History of the University of Freiburg. Since December 2016 research assistant at the Institute for the Culture and History of the Germans in Northeastern Europe, Lüneburg; from April to September 2017 scholarship holder of the Humboldt Research Track Scholarship. Since November 2017 member of the Graduate School for East and Southeast European Studies.

Positions, Assignments and Memberships

Publications

Articles and Book Chapters

With Martin Wagner, Susanne Quitmann und Helge Jonas Pösche: Die Atombombenabwürfe auf Nagasaki und Hiroshima im August 1945: "Global Moments"? Teil 1. In: Zeitgeschichte online (13.04.2017). URL: http://www.zeitgeschichte-online.de/thema/die-atombombenabwuerfe.

Further Publications

Zus. mit Jane Freeland: Physical Violence and State Legitimacy in Late Socialism – Final Conference, 27.02.2014–01.03.2014, Berlin. In: H-Soz-Kult (23.06.2014). URL: http://www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-5436.

Biopower and Physical Violence – Embodied Experiences in Communist Europe, 24.01.2014, Potsdam. In: H-Soz-Kult (15.04.2014). URL: http://www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-5308.