Children's Hunger and Humanitarian Relief in the Aftermath of the Great War

07.06.2016 (10:10)

Dr. Friederike Kind-Kovács on Compassion for the Distant Other in new anthology on poverty, welfare and social ties in Modern Europe

An article on Children's Hunger and Humanitarian Relief in the Aftermath of the Great War has recently been published with Berghahn Books by Dr. Friederike Kind-Kovács, a Postdoc of the Graduate School for East and Southeast European Studies in Regensburg. The article is part of the anthology "Rescuing the Vulnerable: Poverty, Welfare and Social Ties in Modern Europe" (= International Studies in Social History; Vol. 27) edited by Beate Althammer, Lutz Raphael, and Tamara Stazic-Wendt.

In many ways, the European welfare state constituted a response to the new forms of social fracture and economic turbulence that were born out of industrialization — challenges that were particularly acute for groups whose integration into society seemed the most tenuous. Covering a range of national cases, this volume explores the relationship of weak social ties to poverty and how ideas about this relationship informed welfare policies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By focusing on three representative populations — neglected children, the homeless, and the unemployed — it provides a rich, comparative consideration of the shifting perceptions, representations, and lived experiences of social vulnerability in modern Europe.

 

Friederike Kind-Kovács: Compassion for the Distant Other: Children's Hunger and Humanitarian Relief in the Aftermath of the Great War, in: Beate Althammer; Lutz Raphael; Tamara Stazic-Wendt (eds.): Rescuing the Vulnerable: Poverty, Welfare and Social Ties in Modern Europe, New York; Oxford 2016.

Go back